The Five-Eyed Bookworm

Eclectic Reader. Lover of beautiful book covers.

2014 Graphic Novels Challenge

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This is a personal reading challenge. I’ve always loved illustrations, color and art so I bet I’m going to have lots of fun with this.

After reading the reviews for Watchmen, I was intrigued. I know it’s an old one but I couldn’t resist checking out what made people like it so much. Reading the first few pages, I was amazed at how it was written.

I went on to search for other comics or graphic novels that might pique my interest. So for 2014, my aim is to read at least five. Here is my list:

Black Hole by Charles Burns

The setting: suburban Seattle, the mid-1970s. We learn from the outset that a strange plague has descended upon the area’s teenagers, transmitted by sexual contact. The disease is manifested in any number of ways — from the hideously grotesque to the subtle (and concealable) — but once you’ve got it, that’s it. There’s no turning back.

As we inhabit the heads of several key characters — some kids who have it, some who don’t, some who are about to get it — what unfolds isn’t the expected battle to fight the plague, or bring heightened awareness to it , or even to treat it. What we become witness to instead is a fascinating and eerie portrait of the nature of high school alienation itself — the savagery, the cruelty, the relentless anxiety and ennui, the longing for escape.

And then the murders start.

As hypnotically beautiful as it is horrifying, Black Hole transcends its genre by deftly exploring a specific American cultural moment in flux and the kids who are caught in it- back when it wasn’t exactly cool to be a hippie anymore, but Bowie was still just a little too weird.

To say nothing of sprouting horns and molting your skin… – Amazon

Blankets by Craig Thompson

Wrapped in the landscape of a blustery Wisconsin winter, Blankets explores the sibling rivalry of two brothers growing up in the isolated country, and the budding romance of two coming-of-age lovers. A tale of security and discovery, of playfulness and tragedy, of a fall from grace and the origins of faith. – Goodreads

Ghost World by Daniel Clowes

Ghost World has become a cultural and generational touchstone, and continues to enthrall and inspire readers over a decade after its original release as a graphic novel. Originally serialized in the pages of the seminal comic book Eightball throughout the mid-1990s, this quasi-autobiographical story (the name of one of the protagonists is famously an anagram of the author’s name) follows the adventures of two teenage girls, Enid and Becky, two best friends facing the prospect of growing up, and more importantly, apart. Daniel Clowes is one of the most respected cartoonists of his generation, and Ghost World is his magnum opus. Adapted into a major motion picture directed by Terry Zwigoff (director of the acclaimed documentary Crumb), which was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay. This graphic novel is a must for any self-respecting comics fan’s library. Two-color comics throughout. – Amazon

Chew by John Layman, Rob Guillory (Illustrator)

Tony Chu, the cibopathic federal agent with the ability to get psychic impressions from the things he eats, is on a bizarre new case. A newly discovered fruit takes Agent Chu to a remote island full of secrets, Presenting the second storyline of IGN.com’s pick for Best Indie Series of 2009 and MTV Splash Page.com’s pick for Best New Series of 2009. Find out what the fuss is about in this latest a twisted and darkly funny comic about cops, crooks, cooks, cannibals and clairvoyants.strangeness-and a shadowy killer with a particularly sinister appetite. – Goodreads

I finished reading Chew Volume 1 this year so I’m moving on to Volume 2. I’m pretty sure that this comic isn’t for everyone as it deals with twisted and dark themes such as cannibals, but if you’ve got the stomach for it then you might want to read it.

Watchmen by Alan Moore, Dave Gibbons (Illustrator) John Higgins (Colorist)

This Hugo Award-winning graphic novel chronicles the fall from grace of a group of super-heroes plagued by all-too-human failings. Along the way, the concept of the super-hero is dissected as the heroes are stalked by an unknown assassin.

One of the most influential graphic novels of all time and a perennial best-seller, Watchmen has been studied on college campuses across the nation and is considered a gateway title, leading readers to other graphic novels such as V for Vendetta, Batman: The Dark Knight Returns and The Sandman series. – Goodreads

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Author: 5eyedbookworm

Eclectic reader. Lover of beautiful book covers and stories of lasting interest.

2 thoughts on “2014 Graphic Novels Challenge

  1. Pingback: Bookish (And Not So Bookish Thoughts) | The Five-Eyed Bookworm

  2. Pingback: Great Scott! It’s Clobberin’ Time! | The Five-Eyed Bookworm

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